Leftover Cities

Post #20

The after-event.


Wash over your sins. Wash over my sins. The silk that surrounds us laps at our feet, it’s cool and pleasant touch soothes the aged scars which still twinge. Shadows burnt into the wall: their hands raised as if pleading against a gun or two; the flash in a clear sky comes back every now and then to bring a tear. In darkness though we found light. That perhaps one day, Sagan’s words shall at long last triumph, and no more will one have need to cleanse the skin of those few remaining whose stories shall forever permeate separate memories.


ありがとうございます

“Arigatō gozaimasu”

. . .Thank you. . .


Cover photo from: Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (FF) and written for Friday Fictioneers 

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8 thoughts on “Leftover Cities

    1. Thank you for reading!
      The reference is in relation to the works of Waltz and Sagan, who in a nutshell: altz, one of the most influential theorists of international relations, expresses a degree of equanimity about the consequences of nuclear proliferation that most members of the foreign policy establishment will find horrifyingly complacent. Sagan, considerably more junior but widely published on the organization of nuclear strategy, powerfully argues the dangers of preventive war, accident, and miscalculation.
      I hope that helped.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for reading! In case you do not see the comment above or below, here is a piece about Sagan and Waltz who were/are political theorists centred round the topic of nuclear proliferation: Waltz, one of the most influential theorists of international relations, expresses a degree of equanimity about the consequences of nuclear proliferation that most members of the foreign policy establishment will find horrifyingly complacent. Sagan, considerably more junior but widely published on the organization of nuclear strategy, powerfully argues the dangers of preventive war, accident, and miscalculation.

      Like

  1. Ah, I was interested in the quote, too, but from the comments I realized that you’re talking about Scott Sagan, not Carl Sagan (who could have said something related to your story too.) It’s a thought-provoking, beautiful story about the horors we’re capable of, the pain and the hope of learning from the past. It’s timely too, with Obama’s recent visit to Hiroshima. Excellent writing.

    Like

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